7 TRADITIONAL BRITISH DISHES YOU MUST TRY IN LONDON

7 TRADITIONAL BRITISH DISHES YOU MUST TRY IN LONDON

If you’ve ever wondered what traditional British food is like, you’ve come to the right place. At Cubitt House, each of our London Pubs serves lovingly cooked food using the best locally and seasonally sourced ingredients. We pay homage to British classics whilst introducing a Mediterranean influence to our dishes. From our national obsession with the Sunday Roast to what exactly makes up a Full English, here are our 7 traditional British dishes you must try in London.

BRITISH PUB SNACKS

There is nothing more traditional than ordering a couple of bar snacks to share while drinking at a British pub. We are mighty proud of our bar snack menus found at our Cubitt House London pubs. The most popular include sausage rolls, made from wrapping sausage meat in flaky shortcrust pastry, and served in varying sizes. 

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Popularised in the 18th century as a street food delight, today you will find them on most pub menus, like The Barley Mow’s version, which comes with a dollop of their very own brown sauce to dip it in. It’s all about using the very best produce from the very best suppliers to ensure the very best bar snack. Something we are obsessed with at Cubitt House.

Another must-try is the scotch egg, described by the famous children’s author Enid Blyton as ‘the wholesome snack of choice’. Frequently modernised, the original comprises a hard-boiled egg wrapped in sausage meat and rolled in breadcrumbs before being deep-fat fried. There’s a scotch egg and then there’s a Cubitt House scotch egg.

The Barley Mow uses haggis for a more peppery, hearty taste and across our pubs, you’ll find many iterations of this classic bar snack. You’ll also find plenty of snacks that nod to Britain’s links to India: at The Coach Makers Arms, the Scotch egg is served with curry ketchup, while the devilled eggs are made by mixing the yolk with paprika and other spices. 

FISH AND CHIPS

When people think of British food, the first dish that springs to mind is often fish and chips. 

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Typically eaten on a Friday night and wrapped in yesterday’s newspaper, the humble meal is made up of battered white fish, usually cod or haddock served along with chunky chips and lashings of salt and malt vinegar, and originates from the Jewish migrants who brought it with them from Europe to the capital in the 16th century.

For a traditional take on it, head to The Alfred Tennyson, who serve battered haddock with chips, mushy peas and tartare sauce, or if you fancy a more elevated version, The Thomas Cubitt serves baked hake with Romesco sauce, charred leeks and butter beans – just add rosemary and garlic hand cut chips to get your fried fix. 

SUNDAY ROAST

Another staple of the British diet is the Sunday Roast. As the name suggests, it was traditionally eaten on a Sunday: supposedly, meat and vegetables were left in the oven to slow cook while people were at church, and eaten when they arrived home. Historically, meat was a treat only eaten on Sundays, hence why the dish is held in such high esteem in British culture.

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You’ll find a roast on the menus at almost all the Cubitt House London pubs, from the  Angus beef rump or half roast free range chicken to the Middle White porchetta or leg of lamb. Cubitt House prides itself on only serving the very best meat from the very best suppliers. Walter Rose is just one example. We also serve a nut roast Wellington for our vegetarian diners.

All Brits know that the most important part of any roast is the ‘trimmings’ – i.e. a medley of roasted veg, crispy roast potatoes, lashings of gravy made from the fat of the meat, stuffing, Yorkshire pudding and cauliflower cheese. It’s why we use the best ingredients possible: indeed, every local supplier’s hand is shaken.

BURGERS 

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You would be hard-pressed to find a British pub that doesn’t serve burgers for lunch. Yes, it’s an American invention, but the British spin on it sees patties super-sized, toasted brioche buns and a fantastic array of toppings.

At The Orange, the House burger comes with pancetta, taleggio, guindilla, caramelised onion and a side of rosemary fries, while at The Grazing Goat, vegans will love the plant-based version with avocado, lettuce and classic skinny fries.

FULL ENGLISH BREAKFAST

Brits will travel far and wide while abroad to find their beloved Full English breakfast – and it’s easy to see why.  Purists will expect to see bacon, sausages, eggs, black pudding, baked beans, mushrooms, tomatoes and toast on the plate, with much debate over whether or not hash browns should be included.

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The pretty enormous portion size was intended to fill diners up: whether before a hunt on a country estate in the past, or workers heading to the factories more recently. We’re partial to The Princess Royal’s slightly more elegant take on it, which champions the best of British, with premium ingredients including Burford Brown eggs, Middle White Sausage and sourdough toast. You’d be hard-pressed to find a more delicious version.

PIES

Meat pie and gravy – usually served with mashed potato and peas – is a marvellous staple of British pub fare. 

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Originally conceived as a solution for storing food long term, often at sea, pies became a favourite for workers who had them as a packed lunch. Honest and comforting, there is nothing more satisfying than a tasty pie, with a healthy amount of meat, rich gravy and buttery pastry.

Favourites include steak and ale, or chicken and mushroom. Pies at Cubitt House Pubs are no exception with a variety of pies on offer and often a pie of the week on our specials boards too.  We strongly recommend you try The Grazing Goat’s chicken and bacon pie with creamy cheddar sauce for something a little different.

PUDDINGS NOT DESSERT

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It’s probably something to do with the weather, but we Brits love nothing more than a homely but delicious hot pudding served with a glorious amount of custard or cream.

A favourite is The Barley Mow’s sticky toffee pudding, a sweet steamed sponge made from dates, swimming in malt butterscotch sauce with clotted cream. You can find sticky toffee pudding on many a pub menu across London but I challenge you to find a stickier, wonderfully balanced and more perfect version than this.


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